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Daisy L. Bates Photo

Daisy L. Bates

Mrs. Davisy L. Bates of 1207 West 28th Street, won international acclaim in 1985 for her role as mentor for the nine black students who broke the color barrier at Central High School to attend classes with white students. She is a native of Arkansas, born in Huttig (Union County).

She is the recipient of over 200 citations and awards, including Honorary Doctorate Degrees in Human Letters from Lincoln University, PA; Philander Smith College, Little Rock; Washington University, St Louis, Mo; the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville; the Harriet Tubman Award; the NAACP Springarn Medal; the Diamond Cross of Malta from the Cotillion Society; Delta Sigma Theta’s First Annual Mary Church Terrell Award; the Sojourner Truth Award; the Robert S Abbott Award; and many others. She was listed in “Who’s Who in American Women, ” named “One of the Top Nine News Personalities of the World for 1957” by the Associated Press; and named “Outstanding Citizen of the Year (1957) ” by the National Council of Negro Women.

The first woman to address the Massachusetts State Senate, She was awarded the Senate gavel, made from the Battleship of the USS Constitution. She has been presented keys to many major cities in this country. Mrs. Bates is also the author of the book, The Long Shadow of Little Rock, published by David McKay of New York, 1962.

Mrs. Bates and her husband, LC Bates published the Arkansas State Press, an outspoken weekly newspaper. In 1959, they ceased publication of the newspaper, and Mrs. Bates went to New York City where she wrote The Long Shadow of Little Rock. She later joined the Democratic National Committee and worked out of the National Headquarters in Washington. DC during the Kennedy-Johnson administration.

In 1984, Ms Bates decided to revitalize the Arkansas State Press, as a tribute to her husband, and as a vehicle for positive images and performances for the African-American community in Arkansas. During this same year, Mrs. Bates was recognized by the Arkansas Gazette as one of the most influential persons in the state of Arkansas.