HONOREES

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Leo “Jocko” Louis Carter

There is always a pioneer needed to conquer the landscape of new territories. Leo Louis Carter, or “Jocko” as he was known to his friends and listeners, was that pioneer in the field of urban radio. One of the first radio announcers for KOKY 1440 AM, the first station in Arkansas designed for the culture of the urban community, Carter made an undeniable footprint into the forays of modern African American radio programming.

The Little Rock native assisted in the establishment of the station’s “True Heritage Today,” which was designed to provide entertainment, public service announcements and advertising to the urban community.

While at KOKY, he served in many capacities, including Radio Announcer, Music Director, and later Program Director. With six years of experience in radio, and twelve years of experience in the entertainment field, Carter became one of the most versatile and successful personalities in radio.

After years of success in the Little Rock area markets, Carter became sought after in the music industry’s national arena. He went on to accept a position at FAME Records in Muscle Shoals, Alabama as a National Promotional Director. After working with several labels, including Mercury and Malaco & Stax, Carter was hired by the world’s leading recording company: Warner Brothers Record. He joined their team as the Southeast Regional Promotions Manager for Black Music.

His presence at Warner Brothers served to increase the sale of Black records. In this position, Carter was directly responsible for obtaining airplay for Black artists. With the professional backing of Carter, artists were able to commemorate sales in excess of 500,000 copies. Some of these artists and their titles include Ashford & Simpson’s Send It, George Benson’s Breezin’, and Parliament Funkadelic’s One Nation Under a Groove.

In addition to his contribution to the careers of Black artists and Arkansas urban radio, Carter will always be remembered for his favorite audience petition: “Don’t meet me there; beat me there!”