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Mr. David Evans

David L. Evans is a native of Phillips County, Ark., and holds degrees in electrical engineering from Tennessee State University and Princeton. Before coming to Harvard he worked in Huntsville, Ala., on the Saturn/Apollo Project that landed a man on the moon in 1969. While in Huntsville he began a voluntary, one-man college recruiting and placement effort for African-American youth who were admitted to many of the nation’s top colleges. His work was covered by the news media, and he was offered jobs by the College Entrance Examination Board, Harvard College, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was most impressed by Harvard College and its dean of admissions, Chase N. Peterson ’52, and started working in the Admissions Office in 1970 on a two-year leave-of-absence from engineering.

During his time in Cambridge, over 15 times more African American undergraduates have matriculated at Harvard than in the previous 334 years. He has been a proctor in Harvard Yard, an adviser to first-year students, and an assistant dean of freshmen and, he likes to think, a friendly responder to anyone seeking help. He has also been an adviser to the Harvard Foundation since its inception in 1981, and in 2002 received the highest honor that Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences confers on an administrator, the FAS Administrative Prize. At the Black Alumni Weekend in October 2003 some generous alumnae and alumni announced the establishment of the David L. Evans Scholarship Fund. The fund has raised over $600,000 as of May 2005.

In addition to his Harvard accomplishments, David has achieved many goals and firsts throughout his life. He?s a published writer, has been recognized by President George Bush as the 311th “Daily Point of Light? for his educational accomplishments and has been a guest on “Good Morning America” to discuss black male role models for black boys and young men. His appearance resulted from a Newsweek piece in 1993 on the TV image of black males.