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Phyllis Yvonne Stickney

Film, theater, television, radio, and one-woman performances have made Phyllis Yvonne Stickney- actress, comedian, lecturer, writer, dancer, choreographer and Little Rock native—a standout far beyond the scope of the black community. Born in Little Rock, Stickney was raised in the various US cities to which her father, a YMCA executive, was transferred. However, she settled in Harlem, where her theater work began at the Frank Silvers Workshop, and the New Heritage Theater, under the late playwright/director Robert Furman. Her theatrical performances were before sell-out crowds in the 1998 National Black Arts Festival, where she also served as performing arts curator and starred in Nathan Ross Freeman’s The Contract. She began her theatrical producing career at New Heritage with works such as Woza Albert, A Black Woman Speaks, Strivers Row and The Contract. Ms Stickney made her national television debut as single mother Cora Lee in the ABC miniseries The Women of Brewster Place, which also starred Oprah Winfrey and Cicely Tyson. Her subsequent television credits include sitcoms New Attitude, The Cosby Show and A Different World, PBS ‘ Great Performances production of the Colored Museum; and the TnT movie The Portrat, She also is spotlighted in HBO’s The History of Blacks in Comedy. Ms Stickney has also appeared on the silver screen in such notable movies as New Jack City Jungle Fever, Talkin Dirty, Malcolm X, The inkwell; What’s Love Got To Do With It, Die Hard With A Vengeance and the recently-released How Stella got Her Grove Back. Ms Stickney’s Conscious Comedy Concerts have been featured in a number of venues across the country, including Harlem’s Apollo Theater, Concert show titles include, Live and in Chocolate, All That and Brains Too, and An Evening, With An Endangered Species. Her written work appears in an anthology of nine black comedy plays, edited by Pamela Faith Jackson. She also created The Crystal Pyramid, A chore poem for childern. In addition, she served as the first solo female host for Essence’s 1997 Music Festival, and is now a speaker for the 1998 African American Women on the Tour. Ms Stickney’s awards include the title African-Centered Scholar by the African Think Tank. In 1983 she won the Audelco Award, Black theater’s equivalent to the Tony Award, for her Performance in Furman’s adaptation of Moliere’s Tartuffe, and later won a second Audelco for her original on-woman show, Bis Mama an Nem. In connection with her theater work, Ms Stickney offer ‘R U Out of Order workshops which, according to promotional material are offered to student who “needs a reintroduction to the order of our universe.